Biographical Sketches of Residents in Barre, Vermont

The following biographical sketches of residents of Barre Vermont have been extracted from a variety of sources.

Norman W. Braley, M. D.,

The first President of the National Bank of Barre, was born in Pomfret, Vt., Aug. 14, 1823, and was graduated at the Vt. Medical College at Woodstock, in 1844. He soon after commenced practice in Washington, Vt., where he remained a few years, and moved to Chelsea, where he lived until he came to Barre. By his skill and success as a physician, the Doctor in the 25 years of his practice gained an extensive and a lucrative ride and a reputation which placed him in the first rank of physicians in the State. He removed to Barre in 1872, and identified himself at once with the business interests of the place, using his influence, and freely contributing of his means to further every enterprise which promised to promote the prosperity of the place. He died Sept. 11, 1880, of apoplexy. His wife, Mrs. Armina (Califf) Braley, to whom he was married Nov. 16, 1852, and 3 sons, survive him.[1]Page, C. Elizabeth (Hemenway)., Hemenway, A. Maria. (186791). The Vermont historical gazetteer: a magazine, embracing a history of each town, civil, ecclesiastical, biographical and … Continue reading

Carleton Family

Rev. Hiram Carleton, born in Barre, July 18, 1811; graduated at Middlebury College in 1833; was a teacher in Shoreham, 1833-34; studied at Andover Theo. Sem. 1834-37; pastor of the Cong’l Church in Stowe in 1818. He has published an Analysis of the 24th chapter of Matthew. — Pierson’s Catalogue of Middlebury Coll.

Hiram Carleton was the seventh son of Jeremiah and Deborah Carleton, early settlers in this town; his father, Jeremiah Carleton, died Sept. 3, 1844, and his mother Mar. 18, 1843. He has living in town at this time (1881), two brothers, — Jeremiah Carleton, 2d, born Aug. 16, 1799; David Carleton, born Sept. 2, 1809. The former, Jeremiah 2d, is father of Rev. Marcus M. Carleton, a missionary of the Presbyterian Board, in Umballah, India; the latter, David, is father of Hiram Carleton, Esq., now of Montpelier.

There were 10 children, I think, in the old family. The Carletons are a family of more than average ability; with some marked peculiarities, but men of character. Rev. Hiram Carleton, D. D., is now Rector of an Episcopal church in Wood’s Hole, Mass. Rev. Marcus Carleton of Umballah married Calista Bradford, daughter of Rodney Bradford of this place. Some ten or twelve years since she came unattended from India via. San Francisco arriving here in the spring of 1869, with 5 children, the eldest hardly in his teens, the youngest a mere babe. Her two eldest boys fitted for college in the Academy here; entered Amherst College, (their father’s alma mater,) and graduated there; the eldest has since graduated in medicine from the College of Physicians & Surgeons in N. Y.; is with his mother; his sisters, now grown to accomplished young ladies, are soon to return to India; the 2d son has a position in the Public Library in New York.[2]Page, C. Elizabeth (Hemenway)., Hemenway, A. Maria. (186791). The Vermont historical gazetteer: a magazine, embracing a history of each town, civil, ecclesiastical, biographical and … Continue reading

William Clark

William Clark, son of Dea. Francis Clark, Senior, graduated at Dartmouth about 1840; and at Andover Theol. Sem.; was engaged for several years as a teacher in Georgia; for a time settled over the Cong. church at Orford, N. H.; subsequently went under the auspices of the American Board of Foreign Missions to Turkey; was afterwards located at Milan, Italy, both as U. S. Consul and as the head of an educational institution; some time about 1872, returned to America and purchased a home in Newbury, Vt., which he fitted up in a handsome manner, then, for several years, a private boarding school for young ladies, known as “Montebello,” was kept up by his wife, (who was a daughter of Nathaniel Farrington, of Walden, Vt.,) and their daughter (an only child) who was a young lady of fine accomplishments. Mr. Clark returned to Europe about 1875 or ’76, as the representative of a New York business house, and has since been for the most of the time in Germany. He returned a year or two since for his family, who returned with him, the property at Newbury being disposed of. Mr. Clark is a man of fine presence, a fine scholar, and the master of several languages.[3]Page, C. Elizabeth (Hemenway)., Hemenway, A. Maria. (186791). The Vermont historical gazetteer: a magazine, embracing a history of each town, civil, ecclesiastical, biographical and … Continue reading

William A. Dodge

William A. Dodge, son of Dea. Nathaniel Dodge, graduated at Burlington about the year 1844; studied law; has removed from town.[4]Page, C. Elizabeth (Hemenway)., Hemenway, A. Maria. (186791). The Vermont historical gazetteer: a magazine, embracing a history of each town, civil, ecclesiastical, biographical and … Continue reading

Hon. Warren Ellis

Hon. Warren Ellis came into Barre about 1803, from Claremont, N. H.; was born May 24, 1777. He was a saddler by trade, and carried on the business very successfully. He gave considerable attention to music, was a good performer on the violin, taught singing, and was one of the best vocalists of his day. After he had done singing in public, he took great delight in conversing and instructing others in the science of music. He held the office of town clerk of Barre 7 years, was judge of the County Court 6 years, and represented the town 7 years in the General Assembly. He has one son, Warren H. Ellis, Esq., who resides at Waukegan, Ill.; is clerk of the County Court for that county, and one daughter, Mrs. D. H. Sherman, who resides in the West. He died at Barre, June 10, 1842, aged 65 years.[5]Page, C. Elizabeth (Hemenway)., Hemenway, A. Maria. (186791). The Vermont historical gazetteer: a magazine, embracing a history of each town, civil, ecclesiastical, biographical and … Continue reading

Hon. James Fisk

Hon. James Fisk came into Barre about 1796, from Greenwich, Mass.; was elected one of the selectmen in 1799, a member of the Legislature in 1800, and represented the town 9 years; was a judge of the County Court in 1802; was 10 years a Member of Congress; received the appointment of Governor of the Territory of Indiana, which he declined; was a Senator in Congress from 1817 to 1819, when he accepted the appointment of Collector for the District of Vermont, and subsequently removed to Swanton. He was a very able and efficient legislator; could express his views upon almost any subject without previous preparation. He was a firm friend of Mr. Madison, and frequently counselled with him relative to the subject of carrying on the War of 1812. Judge Fisk was a Republican of that time, and a live Whig in 1840. He died some years since.[6]Page, C. Elizabeth (Hemenway)., Hemenway, A. Maria. (186791). The Vermont historical gazetteer: a magazine, embracing a history of each town, civil, ecclesiastical, biographical and … Continue reading

Major Nathan Harrington

Major Nathan Harrington was the sixth settler in Barre. He came from Holden, Mass., about the year 1790, and settled on the East hill in the town; cleared the farm on which his grandson, Ira P. Harrington, now resides; was one of the first board of selectmen; was the first town representative, and discharged the duties of many of the town offices, with great promptness. He was a Mark Antony man — He “spoke right on,” was always kind and generous, frank and honest. He was nearly blind some years before his death, which occurred at Barre, July 30, 1828, aged 71 years.[7]Page, C. Elizabeth (Hemenway)., Hemenway, A. Maria. (186791). The Vermont historical gazetteer: a magazine, embracing a history of each town, civil, ecclesiastical, biographical and … Continue reading

Calvin Jay Keith

See: Biography of Calvin Jay Keith

Judge Chapin Keith and Family

Judge Keith was a man noted for energy and perseverance, and whatever enterprise he undertook was generally a success. He came from his native town, Uxbridge, Mass., with his young family, the youngest being only three months old, September, 1801, and settled in Barre. He was born May 17, 1771, and was married to Elisabeth Taft, June 24, 1790. She was born May 13, 1769. They had four children, all boys.

Hon. Chapin Keith was Judge of the probate court for several years, and afterwards high sheriff for many more years. He also held many town offices, and was much interested in the Chelsea turnpike, on which his tavern was located.

When he first arrived from Uxbridge with his young family, he was duly warned out of town, lest he should become a charge on the good people of Barre. it was a custom of the time, if any came that it was doubtful about. But he never failed to take care of himself and his. His wife was also truly a helpmeet, and did her full share in getting a living; as landlady she excelled.

Judge Keith, although a good judge of property matters, and an active business man, could never speak in public except with great diffidence. While sheriff it became his duty to proclaim who was governor, and after the votes had been counted, he finished by saying, “God save the King,” when he meant to have said “the People.” He used to relate that it cost him several gallons of wine to mend that mistake. He was very successful, as elsewhere said, in his tavern-keeping.

Hon. Roswell Keith, oldest son of Judge Chapin, and the late judge Keith of Montpelier, where he died Oct. 25, 1874; was born in Uxbridge, Ms., Nov. 28, 1790, and was at his death in his 84th year. [For a more full description see History of Montpelier.] [8]Page, C. Elizabeth (Hemenway)., Hemenway, A. Maria. (186791). The Vermont historical gazetteer: a magazine, embracing a history of each town, civil, ecclesiastical, biographical and … Continue reading

Silas Ketchum

See: Biography of Silas Ketchum

Deacon Jonas Nichols

Deacon Jonas Nichols was one of the first settlers in Barre; took up the lot of land on which John N. Wilson now resides; cleared it up, and resided on the same lot until his death, which took place Aug. 26, 1841, aged 96 years.[9]Page, C. Elizabeth (Hemenway)., Hemenway, A. Maria. (186791). The Vermont historical gazetteer: a magazine, embracing a history of each town, civil, ecclesiastical, biographical and … Continue reading

Dr. Socrates Sherman

Dr. Socrates Sherman, native of Barre; a skillful physician; Medical Director of the Department of Virginia during the war; Member of Congress one term, and at the time of his death, postmaster of Ogdensburg; died at the latter place in 1873.[10]Page, C. Elizabeth (Hemenway)., Hemenway, A. Maria. (186791). The Vermont historical gazetteer: a magazine, embracing a history of each town, civil, ecclesiastical, biographical and … Continue reading

Hon. Denison Smith

Hon. Denison Smith came into Barre about 1808, from Plainfield, N. H., and established himself as an attorney, and became eminent in his profession. He was called to many offices, of trust; was 6 years State’s attorney, 3 years a member of the Legislature, and one year judge of the County Court. In all his business relations, he was ever true to every trust; was genial, kind and affable; never urging suitors into litigation. His health was poor for some years previous to his death, which occurred at Barre, Feb. 8, 1836, aged 51 years. He left one son, Denison K. Smith.[11]Page, C. Elizabeth (Hemenway)., Hemenway, A. Maria. (186791). The Vermont historical gazetteer: a magazine, embracing a history of each town, civil, ecclesiastical, biographical and … Continue reading

Denison K. Smith

Denison K. Smith, who was a graduate of Dartmouth College; fitted himself for the practice of law, resided in Barre, and became a good book lawyer. He represented the town in the Legislature 2 years, and was State’s attorney 2 years. He was twice married, but was without wife or children at his death, which took place at Barre, Mar. 6, 1860; age 38 years.[12]Page, C. Elizabeth (Hemenway)., Hemenway, A. Maria. (186791). The Vermont historical gazetteer: a magazine, embracing a history of each town, civil, ecclesiastical, biographical and … Continue reading

Joshua Twing

Born in Wilbraham, Mass.; for 40 years a citizen of Barre; in mill-building long stood without a known rival. His machine-shop and mill-wrighting establishment at Barre village had a reputation extending far beyond the town and county even. It is the boast of scores of mechanics that they learned their trade of Joshua Twing. It was a custom with him to encourage poor young men to learn a trade, and then, with a good character and diligent hand, work their way up to distinction. He first learned his trade as an apprentice to a machinist, after which he was emphatically self-made; and the moment success began to crown his labors for himself, he turned to his straitened parents and provided for them. In this respect his example was like that of Joseph to his father, Jacob; and the same cup of kindness came back to cheer his declining years, from the hands of his children. Strictly honest in all his extensive dealings, and generous to a fault, the memory of him embalmed with the blessings of the poor, he still left an ample estate, the result of a long life of industry and personal prudence. He died in Montpelier, at the residence of his son-in-law, H. S. Loomis, in his 82d year, and labored with his own hands up to the last week of his life. He was buried in Barre Cemetery, where a fine granite monument has been erected to his memory. [13]Obituary in Watchman & Journal

Col. Benjamin Walker

Col. Benjamin Walker was one of the early settlers in Barre. He was born in Rehoboth, Mass., 1751, was a Lieutenant in the Revolution, was at the capture of Burgoyne, and commanded a company of the Massachusetts line, (his captain being sick). He removed to Barre, Mar. 1793; held the office of selectman a number of years; was a Colonel of the militia; was the first justice of the peace; represented the town in the General Assembly, and was called to discharge the duties of arbitrator and committee to settle matters of difference between his townsmen and the towns around him in numberless instances. He was quite infirm for some years previous to his death, which occurred at Barre, May, 1823.[14]Page, C. Elizabeth (Hemenway)., Hemenway, A. Maria. (186791). The Vermont historical gazetteer: a magazine, embracing a history of each town, civil, ecclesiastical, biographical and … Continue reading

Capt. Joseph Watson

Capt. Joseph Watson settled at an early day in the south-easterly part of the town; carried on the tanning and shoemaker business a number of years. He became involved in building a part of the Chelsea turnpike in 1808; sold out and retired from business, but lived to the age of 99 years. His death occurred June 7, 1862. [15]Page, C. Elizabeth (Hemenway)., Hemenway, A. Maria. (186791). The Vermont historical gazetteer: a magazine, embracing a history of each town, civil, ecclesiastical, biographical and … Continue reading

References

1 Page, C. Elizabeth (Hemenway)., Hemenway, A. Maria. (186791). The Vermont historical gazetteer: a magazine, embracing a history of each town, civil, ecclesiastical, biographical and military. Burlington, Vt. [etc.].
2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15 Page, C. Elizabeth (Hemenway)., Hemenway, A. Maria. (186791). The Vermont historical gazetteer: a magazine, embracing a history of each town, civil, ecclesiastical, biographical and military. Burlington, Vt. [etc.].
13 Obituary in Watchman & Journal

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